DALS WILDLIFE SITE { WILDLIFE OF NORTHERN ENGLAND}

WILDLIFE OF NORTHERN ENGLAND

Sea shore shown to the children part one   Fishes.

Image courtesy of Nick Harris {originally posted to Flickr CC BY-SA 2.5 license

Introduction

The text on this page is taken from the book "The Seashore shown to the Children", by Janet Harvey Kelman and Theodore Wood, published in 1910 in London and Edinburgh by T.C. and E.C. Jack.

The pages are provided courtesy of the Biodiversity Heritage Library. The coloured images are my personal choice.  {see reuse of images below} .

The book is not in copyright { see also notes to the reader below}.

Part one-fishes

In part two-{content boxes above click on title and scroll down to view} Molluscs

In part three  Bivalve molluscs

In part four  Crabs 

Part five- Lobsters and their kin 

In part six Seaworms

Part seven- Starfish

Part eight  Sea cucumbers and Jellyfish

Part nine   Sea anemones

Part ten  Sponges and Seaweeds.

Click on the relevant content box and scroll down to view. 

part  

 

 

Flounder blending with the pebbley back ground

Image courtesy of Moondigger CC BY-SA 2.5 license.File:Flounder camo md.jpg

Note

The spelling of plaice is now Place.

Dogfish caught in Ireland.

Image courtesy of Peter van der Sluijs CC BY-SA 3.0 license.File:Dogfish caught in Ireland.jpg

Notes to the reader

Since the book was published in 1910 there have been many changes. The seas have been polluted by plastic and other waste. The temperatures have altered due to global warming, and some species have become endangered due to that and over-fishing. 

Other species are now found further north than ever before. 

However, the species are accurately described along with detailed images. 

There are other articles on fish on this site. Go to content banners above click on the relevant title and scroll down to view. 

Reuse of images.

The images on this page may be reused. However, the name of the relevant author must be attributed along with any accompanying license.

Thank you for visiting.